Paula Baumann
Slip Into the Sea

Fall 2015

Biography & Artist's Statement
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Biography & Artist's Statement

Paula A. Baumann is an artist working primarily in the textile medium creating wall, display, and ceiling-hung textile constructions using surface design, knitting, printmaking and Shibori resist techniques.

Paula's dimensional silk works are exhibited throughout the country. The Xavier University art collections include her surface-design piece "Tolerance Is Too Thin."

Paula received her B.F.A. from Xavier University, Cincinnati, OH, in 2012 with a dual concentration in Fiber Art and Art History. The solo exhibition for her senior thesis, "Green Textures," included a study of natural dyes. In addition, she completed a thesis about twentieth century woodcut printmaker Gustave Baumann and is a Cincinnati Woman's Club scholarship recipient.

Paula has studied at Arrowmont School of Arts and Crafts and at Split Rock Arts at the University of Minnesota. She is a member of the Surface Design Association, the American Craft Council, and the Weavers Guild of Greater Cincinnati. She has exhibited in juried exhibitions throughout the South.

Artist Statement

The heart of my work is accepting the challenge to alter textiles from a single plane into dimensional space. The feel of materials, hard and soft, is magnetic, and the reflective nature of silk is a favorite. Organza holds its shape with limited coaxing to bring out a new 3-D character. The silk, paper-yarn-and-wire sculpted pieces in this exhibition reveal a plastic art: a sculpture. A recent addition to my work includes the process of combining woodcut prints and textiles.

The works in this exhibition generally represent sea life, as well as the ugly conditions triggered by man that lead to their demise. Growing up on a farm brings with it a sense of responsibility as well as the shame of fertilizer and weed control. Nothing is more at risk today than our lakes and seas. Over-fishing, oil and chemical spills, nutrient runoff, ocean warming and acidification have many marine creatures poised for mass extinction.